Cold spell continues

The cold spell continues, and although it is a little warmer by day, overnight frosts are still occurring across many parts of the country. Last night saw another moderate or severe frost particularly across the north. It’s little wonder because on a walk to Glen Affric yesterday all the shaded places in the gln still had a covering of snow from the showers earlier in the week, and the snow on the mountains was looking suitably alpine on another beautiful sunny day in the highlands.

It’s not surprising the snow in the shadier parts of the glen still lies thick on the ground with the severe frosts we have seen over the last five nights since the milder day last Thursday.

The cold weather since the start of April is aligned from Iceland southeast towards the Balkans. The weather further west of this axis is milder, much milder across southern Greenland (+6°C), it’s also extremely mild to the northeast of this axis across northern Russia (+9°C) and I’m sure it won’t be long before the tundra is on fire again in Siberia.

I think the weathercasters on TV have little idea about what climate is and how the weather we experience each day creates it. All they seen to be looking for is a chance to tell you when it will end, or if it’s cold, how soon it’ll be before it warms up. They will of course throw in an odd line about what extreme was broken last night or how yesterday was the warmest for ‘x’ number of years. I do realise that the service they supply is a weather forecast but Climate, and what the climate is doing is given short shrift on the BBC, and needs to be given more consideration than just an odd graphic in the Farmers forecast on a Sunday or a monthly program of videos of weather disasters from around the globe. Thanks to advances in NWP in recent years, weather on TV seems to be overly obsessed with what comes next, rather with what came before, or what’s happening now.

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