February weather lore

Courtesy Wikipedia

February is quite a popular month for weather lore as we’ve already seen with all the sayings that surround Candlemas earlier this month. Here’s a few more that concern, one or two of which may have a grain of truth in them. As usual some of them make a bit of sense and reflect the fickle nature of the month weather wise, but a lot of them are contradictory and ridiculous, and one or two them even quite bizarre. They were all collected by Richard Inwards in his book Weather Lore that was published in 1867.

  • A February spring is not worth a pin (Cornwall)
  • All the months in the year curse a fair Februeer.
  • As long as the sunbeam comes in on Bridget’s feast-day (1st), the snow comes before May Day. (Isle of Man)
  • Double-faced February.
  • February fill ditch, black or white, don’t care which; if it be white, it’s the better to like.
  • February fill dyke be it black or be it white; but if it be white, it’s better to like.
  • February fill dyke with what thou dost like.
  • February fill dyke; March lick it out.
  • February makes abridge, and March breaks it.
  • February rain is as good as manure. (Scotland)
  • February rain is only good to fill ditches (Spain and Portugal)
  • February singing, never stints stinging.
  • February, an ye be fair, the hoggs (unshorn sheep) ’11 mend, and naething pair (lessen), February, an ye be foul, the hoggs ’11 die in ilka pool. (Tweedside)
  • Februeer doth cut and shear.
  • Fogs in February mean frosts in May.
  • For every thunder with rain in February there will be a cold spell in May.
  • If bees get out in February the next day will be windy and rainy. (Surrey)
  • If February give much snow, a fine summer it doth foreshow (France)
  • If in February there be no rain ’tis neither good for hay nor grain.
  • If it freezes on St. Matthias’ Day, it will freeze for a month together. (24th)
  • In February if thou hearest thunder thou wilt see a summers wonder. (France)
  • In February o’ a favoured year, nae paddock suld croot nor croon, but rampin’ showers o’ hail and sleet come rakin’ o’er the moon. (Scotland)
  • Isolated fine days in February are known in Surrey as “weather-breeders” and are considered as certain to be followed by a storm.
  • It is better to see a troop of wolves than a fine February. (Germany)
  • Mad February takes his father into the sunshine and beats him. (Spain)
  • One would rather see a wolf in February than a peasant in his shirt-sleeves. (Germany)
  • Snow in February puts little wheat in the granary.
  • Snow which falls in the month of February puts the usurer in a good humour. (Italy)
  • St. Matthias breaks the ice; if he finds none, he will make it.
  • The fair of Auld Deer [third Thursday in February] is the warst day in a’ the year. (Aberdeen)
  • The night of St. Peter shows what weather we shall have for the next forty days. (22nd)
  • There is always one fine week in February.
  • There will be as many frosts in June as there are fogs in February.
  • Thunder in February or March, poor sugar [maple] year.
  • Violent north winds in February herald a fertile year.
  • Warm February, bad hay crop, cold February, good hay crop.
  • When February gives snows, it fine weather foreshows.(Normandy)
  • When gnats dance in February the husbandman becomes a beggar.
  • When it rains in February all the year suffers.
  • When it rains in February it will be temperate all the year.
  • When the cat in February lies in the sun, she will creep behind the stove in March.
  • When the north wind does not blow in February, it will surely come in March.
  • Whenever the latter part of February and beginning of March are dry there will be a deficiency of rain up to Midsummer Day
  • Winter’s back breaks about the middle of February.

3 thoughts on “February weather lore”

  1. That’s a nice portrait of you Bruce, looks like you’re contemplating lunch !

  2. Self portraits are always good, I take it that’s your best side !!!

    Nice list, the only one I know is “A February spring is not worth a pin”

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